Wednesday, October 3, 2012

Reclaimed Wood Bench Project and Plans



Reclaimed Wood Bench Project and Plans


After my mudroom remodel (pics coming soon to Lipstick and Sawdust), I wanted to create a bench where my children could sit and put on their shoes, by the door. I wanted to be able to fit two baskets that I already had underneath so that the shoes would stay contained and organized. This bench is the perfect height for my son (2) to climb up on and my daughter (6) to also use. I decided to build this bench custom to fit the little nook I have in my mudroom, the dimensions can be adjusted easily. This project was sooo easy (once I figured out the dimensions and angles) that it probably took me under an hour of total "work" (I say work, but woodworking is not really work for me, more like therapy).

Bonus: This bench cost me NOTHING!

I found some long boards from a dumpster, pulled them out and cut them creating this reclaimed wood bench. I used scraps to create the bottom support and legs. Because I used these reclaimed boards planks (I think they used to belong to a picnic table) they are heavy and not exactly 2x6's. My top planks measured exactly 2 x7 inches. You may have to adjust the measurements if you are using true 2 x 6's as the top planks.

You can always think outside of the box and pick up old boards that you find, I have no shame when it comes to pulling things out of the dumpster. Bonus if the old boards have cracks and holes already, creating a "distressed" look.

Look at a similar bench concept - I am not even going to type the price of this one from Restoration Hardware, I may croak.

Restoration Hardware Salvage Bench Small

How I built the bench:

Finished Dimensions are:

14.5 wide x 37 inches long x 15 inches high

Cut list-

2 top planks measuring 37 inches long and 6 or 7 inches wide. Use a 2x6 or similar.
2 short supports - 2x6's cut to 14 inches long
4 2x4's at 14 inches long

8 total pieces!!!! Thats it!

Step One:

Cut your small support boards. I used two 2x6's at 14 inches long, and created two long octagonal shapes, by cutting the ends at 45 degree angles with my compound miter saw.

Set your saw at 45 degrees.




Step 2 - Cut your top planks.

I used planks sized at 2 x7. If you are using 2x6's you can cut them the same dimensions and angles only you will have to do some adjusting at the end.

My LOONNGGG Plank I cut smaller. 





Step 3- Cut your legs, cut 4 equal pieces.

I used 2x4's and cut each piece at 60 degree angles on each end. I believe I started each 2x4 at 14 inches long when it was square.

Step 4- Add legs to small supports.

I turned my 2x6 small supports upside down and added the legs, criss-crossed - kind of like a picnic table. I used my super duper glue called Chemrex CX 948 (actually a carpet tack glue) and clamped them overnight. Then in the morning I screwed through the top of the small supports countersunk wood screws attaching to each 2x4. Make sure the legs are level...using a level. You can adjust the legs here in order to accommodate the height you want. Further apart makes it a little shorter...closer together makes it a little taller.

Standing up

Upside down


Added 2.5 inch deck screws to attach legs for more stability.



Step 5 -

Attach legs to top planks.

I added a small piece of trim in-between to space out the planks. 

Here in the diagram you can see the character holes that already existed when I pulled the planks out of the dumpster. I just left them because I think they look cool, this also adds to the "reclaimed" style of the bench. You could add your own with a drill and pretty large drill bit.

I added the two top planks to the leg supports, put a small piece of wood between them to create a 1/2 inch gap. If you are using 2x6's you will probably have a little larger gap. It was difficult to draw the side view of the bench but the diagram shows the top view. The legs top supports are FLUSH underneath the ENDS of the top planks. I attached the planks with connector bolts underneath through the small supports, the bolts look kinda like these.


Step 5 -

Sand and Stain.

I sanded the piece down but, not too much- because I wanted to keep the rustic look of  the wood.



I stained with Minwax, Provincial 211, using a paintbrush then wiping about 10 minutes later with a rag.

Then spayed two coats with Poly- acrylic. And allowed to dry.




And...because my daughter models EVERYTHING!
Modeling the bench. 
I moved the bench into the mud room:
Sorry bad pic- it was late!

And...my son modeling the bench, notice the hand on the hip??


One last note:

My basket sizes are 2 at 15 inches x 15 inches, at the top. They tapered down some at the bottom.

Hope you enjoyed this tutorial!

Don't forget to "like" Lipstick and Sawdust on Facebook!

Drop me a line!

Thanks, Kristen

9 comments:

  1. Girl, that looks amazing! I love all things reclaimed wood! I'm in the middle of taking down my fence, for the sole purpose of using the reclaimed wood for other projects lol

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  2. That sounds wonderful Kenz! Thanks for the cheers! I just had my garden fence wood taken down (forced by the county) I may build a playhouse for the kids.

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  3. I think it is a great and So beautiful! sometime i also make wooden furniture from recycled teak

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  4. This informative will increase more and more people to know about all this benches wooden.Very Nice Post. I use to buy online benches wooden as its time saving.

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  5. Thanks for sharing such a valuable information.Wooden benches .

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  6. Its is nice post everyone like it and get many information.Everyone can find on google service and get many latest-fun.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Sweet! I really enjoyed to read this post , Pretty awesome posts.
    thanks for sharing it. Love it!
    Adrian G

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  8. This wood bench seems so cool and mind blowing too. Lipstick and sawdust present this lovely idea of making supercool Workbench. I loved it.

    ReplyDelete